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By contactus@drjrobb.com
March 29, 2020
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March 29th is "Mom & Pop Business Day". Why would that be important to a dental office? Well, most dental offices are still what could be considered "Mom & Pop Businesses". With the exception of the corporately owned clinics and the larger practices, most dental offices that have the name of the dentist on them, such as mine: Jennifer G. Robb DMD, are owned by the dentist who works in them--or in some cases dentists. Some are even truly "Mom & Pop Businesses" where both mom and dad are dentists and one or more of their children have also chosen dentistry as a career and all work out of the same office!! How cool is that?

So what are some reasons to choose a "Mom &/or Pop" Dental Office over ones larger ones? 

  • You will have the same dentist or dentists treating you each time. (One of the most common complaints I hear when people switch to my office from one of the larger ones was that they saw a different dentist each time they went for a visit.)
  • Your dentist and her/his staff will get to know you AND can personalize appointments to you. (Corporate practices tend to be centered on productivity and may place limits on appointments, meaning you may need to go multiple times to complete needed services with each visit having a separate charge or you may not get the treatment you need.)
  • A dentist who knows you is more likely to respond to an emergency call from you. 

My goal, when I first noted this holiday was to encourage you to find a small dental office, whether it is my own or another dentist, and use their services--however, since most of us are shut down, except for dental emergencies, due to the coronavirus, that's obviously not feasible. However, if you do find a "Mom & Pop Business" in another field that is still open, please buy something from them to support them. And we dentists hope that once this closure passes, you will strongly consider using or continuing to use our services.

Sincerely,

Dr. Jennifer Robb, General Dentist, 1320 Cooper Foster Park Rd. W, Lorain, OH 44053
440-960-1940
www.drjrobb.com
www.facebook.com/DrJenniferRobb

By contactus@drjrobb.com
March 21, 2020
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These days it seems the coronavirus is affecting all areas of our life and that includes our dental health. With all dental offices unable to see patients, other than dental emergencies (such as pain, swelling, or bleeding), due to federal and state mandates, your dental home care routine is now more important than ever!

Some things you can do at home that will help you prevent problems until you are able to return to your dentist:

  • Brushing Your Teeth Twice A Day: whether you use a manual toothbrush or an electric one, the bristles only clean the areas they touch. You should spend at least 2 minutes each time you brush. That's how long it will take to clean all the exposed surfaces of your teeth. Remember to use a soft touch! Your goal is to remove the sticky, gelatinous plaque that's on the tooth. Brushing too hard will only damage your tooth structure or your gums. 
  • Floss At Least Once A Day: Flossing gets into those areas where your toothbrush bristles can't reach. Try to make a "C" shape around your tooth with the floss as you move it up and down the tooth. This will allow the floss to clean below your gumline. If you know you won't floss, consider buying something like a WaterPik Water Flosser or an Air Flosser. Using either of those is better than not flossing at all.
  • Fluoride Rinses: rinses or mouthwashes that contain fluoride are helpful to prevent cavities between your teeth. The fluoride can help strengthen areas that are just starting to break down. (Note though that regular mouthwashes that do not contain fluoride are mostly for freshening your breath and removing surface food debris. Many will not remove the amount of plaque that good brushing and flossing will.)

At Dr. Robb's office, we're committed to your oral health now and in the future. For non-emergency care, we'll be in touch with you as soon as we can after dental offices reopen.

If you have pain, swelling, or bleeding, we can see you as a dental emergency to get you comfortable--you can call the office at 440-960-1940 or the office cell phone at 440-787-9674. 

Stay safe and healthy! We'll see you on the flip side!

By contactus@drjrobb.com
March 06, 2020
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Did you know March 6th is Dentist's Day? I didn't either until I saw it come up on an app that lists various lesser-known celebrations. So, in honor of Dentist's Day, let's meet the dentist, Dr. Jennifer Robb!

I grew up in Lake County, Ohio where my mom still lives. One of the familial traits on my dad's side was having a space between the two front teeth--a trait I unfortunately inherited. Correcting this required me to wear braces--and not the braces of today, but the type of braces where they put a band around every tooth.

One of my assignments at school was to write an essay on "What I Want To Be When I Grow Up". Unfortunately, I had no idea! So my mom started listing off various occupations, and when she got to orthodontist (the dental specialist who straightens teeth), I was intrigued by the idea of helping people have a better smile. While researching that essay, I discovered that to be an orthodontist, I first had to go to dental school--and to go to dental school, I first had to go to college. 

My mom wanted me to have the experience of going away to college. She also felt that attending a college or university that had a dental school would be advantageous. I heard about the Siena-Georgetown Dental Program through a mailer. When I visited Siena College in Loudonville, NY, I interviewed with both Siena College and Georgetown University and fell in love with Siena's campus. Luckily, I was one of the 12 students chosen for the program, a perk of which was being able to complete my bachelor's degree in 3 years instead of 4. Another aspect of the program was spending a week at Georgetown University's Dental School and writing a paper on Infection Control in Dentistry, which was a new topic back in the late 1980s.

So . . .those of you who know me professionally know I went to the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, not Georgetown University and are probably wondering what happened. Partway through the Siena-Georgetown program, Georgetown University decided to close its dental school, leaving me (and my classmates) to apply to other dental schools to complete our educations. I think meeting Dr. Francis Miklos (the Dean of Students at the time) was what decided me on attending Pitt from 1988-1992.

During dental school, I discovered many aspects of dentistry that I loved--unfortunately, bending orthodontic wire was not one of them! General Dentistry allows me to perform many different procedures: fillings, crowns, bridges, partials, cosmetic dentistry--and even a few root canals, tooth removals, and dentures. I like the variety. And, even though I'm a shy introvert, I enjoy meeting people and getting to know them. 

After I graduated, I returned to Lake County and worked for a dentist in Willoughby Hills. I came to Lorain County in 1994 and worked for a dentist in Elyria. In 1999, I purchased the practice of Dr. Thomas Timko in Lorain and worked for 20 years at his location on Cooper Foster Park Rd. In 2017, Marlene Karpinski chose me to take over the practice of her late husband, Dr. Donald Karpinski. After 20 years, I decided to move my office to a new location--but still on Cooper Foster Park Rd. There were several reasons for this decision, and it was not one I made lightly. The main reason was that the building I'd occupied for 20 years was having foundation problems. 

If you're reading this, and you don't have a dentist, I hope you'll consider my office.

Dr. Jennifer Robb, 1320 Cooper Foster Park Rd. W, Lorain, OH 44053
440-960-1940
www.drjrobb.com
www.facebook.com/DrJenniferRobb

By contactus@drjrobb.com
February 29, 2020
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Did you know we have an in house program that will save you $100.00 or more on your dental care? The enrollment fee includes the two exams, two cleanings* and one set of x-rays that we recommend per year. Children also receive 1 Fluoride treatment) Any other dental care you need receives a discount--even items that we don't normally discount! (*Note: the price includes regular cleanings. If you need periodontal cleanings you will need to pay the difference. Also the cleaning appointments must be done within 8 months of each other to qualify for the plan. Program is per person and is non-transferable. No refunds are made if you fail to schedule your second cleaning appointment within the alloted timeframe.)

By contactus@drjrobb.com
February 29, 2020
Category: Uncategorized
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National Tooth Fairy Day seems a fitting way to end February's National Children’s Dental Health Month. Traditionally, the tooth fairy takes your child's baby teeth and leaves something in return. It could be money or a gift. Because of this practice, you may wonder why it’s important for your child to have dental care. After all, they’re “only baby teeth” that will fall out when his or her adult teeth come in. Baby teeth have a purpose; they’re as important as our adult teeth.

 

Baby teeth help your child chew his or her food, speak properly and also hold space for the adult tooth. Starting good dental habits early can help your child avoid major dental problems later.

 

Your child will get his or her first tooth around age 6 months. The last baby tooth comes in around age 2. Though the front adult teeth come in at age 6, back adult teeth do not erupt until between ages 9 and 12. So in some cases, your child may have that baby tooth in his or her mouth for 10 years!

 

Much of the nutrition we need for growth and development comes from what we eat and drink. Chewing food well helps digestion and may reduce the chances of digestive problems, such as heartburn, both now and later in life.

 

Childhood lisps are cute when you’re young but imagine having to talk that way all the time! Your front teeth help your tongue know where to position itself when making certain sounds for speech. The longer your teeth are not there, the more habitual the speech problem becomes. In some cases, speech therapy might be needed to correct the problem.

 

Tooth decay is a risk from the moment teeth come into your child’s mouth. This is why your dentist or pediatrician says to only put water in your child’s bottle when you put him or her to bed and to not dip pacifiers in anything sugary or sweet. Milk and juice contain sugars that can settle against your child’s teeth. These sugars activate cavity causing bacteria in our mouths.

 

Tooth decay in infants or toddlers is often called Baby Bottle Tooth Decay even if the cause is not a bottle. Baby Bottle Decay most often involves the upper front teeth but it can extend to other teeth as well. In some cases, the damage is so severe that the teeth cannot be repaired and need to be removed.

 

When a baby tooth is lost earlier than it should be, the teeth on either side tend to drift into the space. The adult tooth may not have enough room to come in, resulting in   crooked or crowded teeth. This loss of space is more common for back teeth than for front teeth. If your child loses a back baby tooth at an early age, your dentist may recommend a space maintainer appliance to help preserve the space needed by the adult tooth.

 

Remember, teeth can look healthy but have decay in spots that are not visible. I remember seeing a four-year old whose teeth looked perfect to the naked eye but her cavity-detecting x-rays showed tooth decay in between her back teeth. Had her parents waited until they saw evidence of a cavity to bring her to the dentist, the girl would probably have had a toothache, needed the baby tooth equivalent of a root canal or have had to have the teeth removed!

 

So you see, baby teeth do serve an important function. To keep your child’s teeth healthy, see your dentist regularly starting as young as age 1. If you do not have a dentist, I am accepting new patients. Please call my office at 440-960-1940 or use the contact form on my website at www.drjrobb.com  You can also receive news and special offers on my facebook page at www.facebook.com/DrJenniferRobb 

 

(*Note: Information in this article is not meant to replace the clinical judgement of your healthcare professionals.)

 

Remember, we have a new address now: 1320 Cooper Foster Park Rd. W, Lorain, OH 44053